Skip to main content Skip to search

Archives for heavy equipment transportation company

Do Heavy Haulers Cause Air Pollution?

A battle over viewpoints has been going on for decades over the amount of air pollution that heavy haulers and ordinary tractor-trailer rigs add to the environment. Multiple studies have been conducted and the answer is yes.

It’s inevitable that the trucking industry would add to air pollution. Even though the trucks require diesel rather than traditional gas, they still have engines that create emissions when they burn fuel, just like passenger vehicles, trains and buses.

Heavy Haulers

A 2018 study conducted by the University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering concluded that large diesel trucks were the greatest contributors to black carbon emissions near major roadways. The study indicated that the type of vehicle matters more than traffic volume in near-road pollution.

Another study published in Geophysical Research Letters showed that people living in low-income and BIPOC communities experienced 28 percent greater exposure to nitrogen dioxide(N02) emitted by heavy haulers than those in higher income areas. The affected neighborhoods are often near trucking routes. The study indicated that diesel trucks were the biggest emitters of NO2. What wasn’t mentioned is that production plants, factories and even power plants emit significant amounts of CO2.

A 60 percent decrease in heavy haulers trucking on weekends during the energy crisis between 1973 and 1979 resulted in a 40 percent pollution inequality. Those levels also declined during the pandemic when fewer trucks were on the road and a variety of production facilities were shut down.

NO2 aggravates the respiratory system and it also combines with other chemicals to create ozone and particulates. The compound interacts with oxygen, water and chemicals in the environment to produce acid rain.

The simple answer to the question is yes, heavy haulers and tractor-trailers contribute to air pollution, but so do many other industries ranging from those that provide electric power, manufacture clothing, and preserve food. It’s not just a single industry that’s responsible.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

How to Calculate a Safe Speed with Your Heavy Haul

You often see heavy haulers on interstate highways and the speed at which they’re traveling can be a mystery for other drivers. Some drive the speed limit or more, while others are driving at a more sedate speed. There are actually calculations that are used to determine the speed that a heavy hauler travels.

Safe Speed

Rule of Seconds

Tractor-trailer loads require more time to stop than other vehicles and use the “rule of seconds” in terms of time to govern their speed. If you’re moving at 40 mph, you need to maintain at least 1 second of distance for every 10 ft. of your vehicle length. If you’re driving over 40 mph, you need to add at least 2 seconds and the seconds increase depending upon the length of your vehicle. For instance, a 60 ft. tractor-trailer traveling at over 40 mph should add 7 seconds of distance for every 10 ft. of vehicle length.

Application of the Rule

It can be difficult to judge speeds of other vehicles, particularly on interstate highways. To calculate following distance, watch the vehicle ahead of you when it passes a fixed point such as a specific mile marker, sign, fence, or overpass. Count how many seconds it takes you to reach the same fixed point. Reaching the same point before the applicable number of seconds means you’re following too closely.

Hazardous Conditions

When driving in hazardous conditions such as rain, snow, ice or even high winds, you’ll need to expand the rule of seconds. Depending on road conditions you may have to expand the rule anywhere between 4 and 10 seconds. If you need to come to a full stop in any of those conditions, it will take significantly longer. Your reaction time and braking distance will need to be factored into those situations.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

Are There Limits to Heavy Haul Driving Time?

There are definitely limits to how many hours a heavy haul trucker can drive. However, the rules can get confusing. Federal regulations are different for different classes of trucks. Drivers who transport freight within the same state aren’t required to adhere to federal rules. It’s only when heavy haul drivers cross state lines that they must adhere to federal mandates.

Heavy Haul Driving Time

Drivers must keep a log of the hours driven for each day, along with rest stops. Drivers that have been off duty for 34 consecutive hours receive a “reset” on their hours of operation. Each driver must begin their “shift” after having at least 10 hours of off-duty time.

After those 10 hours of off-duty time, they can be on the road for up to 14 hours, but only 11 of those can be actual drive times. Drivers can’t extend their 14-hour duty time with stops for meals, breaks or fuel stops. Drivers aren’t allowed to work more than 60 hours over 7 consecutive days – or 70 hours over 8 days.

There is an exception to those drive time rules in the event of adverse driving conditions. Snow, fog and unforeseen traffic delays allow drivers to extend their drive time by 2 additional hours. Adverse weather conditions are defined as conditions that won’t allow a driver t pull over at a rest stop to conform to 10 hours off duty. However, if it’s at all possible for a driver to pull over, they’re required to do so if they can’t return to their home terminal.

There’s also a 10-hour exception that can come into play. Drivers can be on duty for 16 hours if they begin and end their run at the same terminal, as long as drive time doesn’t exceed 11 hours. Drivers can’t combine the 16-hour and the adverse weather conditions together. They also can’t use the 16-hour exception again until they’ve had a 34-hour rest.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

What is a Flip Axle?

Heavy haul companies have a variety of trailers to accommodate different types of loads and methods to maintain compliance with a myriad of state regulations. One of those methods is the flip axel. It’s typically employed when a trailer’s axle loading exceeds the gross weight that a particular state will allow on each axle.

Flip Axle

With a heavy hauler, an extra rear axle rests on the trailer frame and can be flipped down when needed to increase the number of axels. It can also be flipped up or removed entirely to reduce the number of axles.

The flip axle is a complete axle attached to the rear frame by pins and plates. When drivers require another axle to handle the weight of a load, the flip axle can be set in a down position on the rear of the trailer. Truckers need to be careful as it can make a trailer over length, which may trigger specific permitting and other requirements.

Another option is the lift axle that’s used on the tractor. The lift axle is typically smaller than the other wheels and tires. It enables the driver to lift the tires off the ground when an extra axle isn’t needed, saves wear and tear on the tires of the lift axle, and mitigates the potential of the tires hitting the ground on rough or uneven terrain.

A flip axle on a tractor-trailer rig shouldn’t be confused with flipping the axle on an RV. It’s a method commonly used by RV owners whose vehicle has low ground clearance. It’s done to increase the vehicle’s clearance so the undercarriage and back end doesn’t scrape the ground. The vehicles are typically designed with “underslung” springs where the axles are positioned.

The springs set under the axles in an underslung position. Changing to an over slung setup can give an additional 6 inches of ground clearance because the springs are positioned above the axle. It’s a measure that shouldn’t be taken lightly as it raises the RV’s center of gravity and makes it more susceptible to cross winds and sway, which can present a problem with steering and stability.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

Services of the Best Heavy Haul Companies

The best heavy haul companies in the business do far more than simply transport items from one point to another. They offer a variety of services that ensure the safety and timely delivery of cargo. They’re cognizant of regulations and required permits whether loads are going across the nation or internationally.

Unique Solutions

Each heavy haul has its own requirements and a heavy haul company works with clients to provide the type of trailer that best fits their needs. Each heavy haul solution is customized and the company prepares the load to be hauled. That includes elements encompassing securing doors and moveable parts, cleaning the equipment to be hauled when needed, and breaking down equipment when necessary.

Heavy Haul

Logistics

The best heavy haul companies leverage the power of advanced logistics to track each load at every step of its journey. The company coordinates with people and facilities to ensure on-time deliveries and the routes that will best facilitate the load’s arrival. The companies also connect with local municipalities if adaptations to utilities are needed or if police assistance is required.

Escorts and Signage

Depending on the cargo, escort vehicles may be required. Specialized signage and lights may be needed and there may be limitations on when loads can actually travel on roadways. The companies provide these services.

Permits

Multiple types of documentation will be required, depending upon the load’s destination. Each state has its own particular regulations and even more documents will be needed to pass through customs or ship internationally. Heavy haul companies know what documents are needed in each instance and ensure that those proofs are acquired.

Personalized Guidance

The best heavy haul companies provide expert guidance from first contact to delivery. They know what type of trailer is required and the best routes to take for the most efficient delivery. The company is able to accommodate transport of super load transportation, have multiple types of trailers, and highly experienced drivers. They’re also available when catastrophic recovery is required.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

Are There Limits to Heavy Haul Drive Time?

Heavy Haul drivers are limited in the number of hours that they can actually spend behind the wheel driving. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) updated many of its rules and those new regulations went into effect as of Sept. 29, 2020.

Drive Time and Breaks

Heavy haul drivers are allowed a maximum of 11 hours of drive time each day after 10 consecutive hours off duty. After coming off a run, drivers can’t drive past 14 consecutive hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty and off-duty time doesn’t extend the 14-hour period. However, the time can be extended when drivers encounter adverse driving conditions such as heavy rain, flooding roads, ice and snow.

The way the regulations are written can be confusing, particularly to new drivers. Drivers can now drive a maximum of 14 hours per day with 10 hours off during a 24-hour period. Long haul drivers can extend that 11-hour driving window into 14 when they encounter adverse driving conditions. Heavy haul drivers are also required to take a 30-minute non-driving break if they’ve been the wheel for more than 8 cumulative hours.

The Work Week

The regulations also affect a driver’s work week. Heavy haul drivers can work a 60-hour work week over the course of 7 days or a 70-hour work week over the course of 8 days. The clock runs continuously each day and doesn’t stop when drivers take a break. Drivers can restart a work week after taking 34 or more consecutive hours off duty.

Time and Safety

Time is money for heavy haul drivers. While many drivers took adequate breaks and received sufficient sleep time, some felt pressure from trucking companies to omit that essential down time. The new rules by the FMCSA were designed to ensure drivers had enough rest to provide a greater level of safety for themselves and others while on the road.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

What to Look for in a Trucking Company

There are dozens of considerations involved when transporting equipment, products and goods to their ultimate destination. Depending on the freight and destination, there may be special documentation to cross borders, restrictions on drive times, and a requirement for escort vehicles. It’s important to compare the quotes of at least three trucking companies before making any decision.

Trucking Company

Experience

Potential clients will want to ensure that the trucking company has experience in hauling the type of cargo or equipment they want transported. It’s a good idea to find out how long the company has been in business, talk to other clients, and/or read reviews.

Equipment

It’s imperative that the trucking company have the right equipment for the job. There’s a huge difference in ordinary freight and a heavy haul load. The company must have the trailer available to accommodate the weight, width and height of the load, along with a tractor able to handle the weight for the terrain that will be traversed.

Permits and Licensing

A highly regulated industry, heavy haul loads in particular must be in compliance with an extensive number of rules and regulations. Those rules can change from state to state and the selected trucking company must be in compliance with all applicable permits and licensing to meet federal regulations and those of multiple states.

Safety First

The federal government establishes safety standards and individual states often have additional laws in place to which truckers must adhere. The trucking company should be willing to share the types of safety measures they take such as securing doors and moveable parts, breaking down equipment when necessary, and cleaning machinery to be transported to eliminate flying debris.

Insurance Issues

Insurance is essential and clients shouldn’t automatically assume that the coverage carried by a trucking company will cover damage to their cargo, property damage, or any injuries that might occur. Discover the extent of the company’s coverage and the protections afforded to the cargo.

Cost

Make sure the trucking company’s costs and services are clearly spelled out in an itemized list and don’t be hesitant about questioning any items on that list. Don’t sign anything if all that’s provided is an estimate. Clients can easily find themselves billed for expensive “extra” services otherwise.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

Heavy Haul Transporting Across State Lines

It would be normal to assume that transporting a heavy haul load would be the same anywhere within the U.S., but that’s not the case. There are federal laws that apply to all heavy haulers, but there are also state laws of which drivers must be cognizant if they’re transporting across state lines.

Those rules can range from whether or not snow tires are mandatory to the specific safety equipment that the driver must carry in the tractor. Hauling those loads across state lines involves extensive planning, coordination, logistics and knowledge of state laws to ensure fines and delays aren’t incurred.

Transporting Across State Lines

Oversized Load Limits

The Department of Transportation sets the standards for what constitutes a heavy haul in terms of height, weight, width and length. However, there are some states that have conflicting standards. Heavy haul companies must be cognizant of those standards in the states through which the load will travel and compensate for them.

Travel Times

The times during which a heavy haul load varies among states. Some restrict transporting across state lines travel to the hours between sunrise and sunset. Others may prohibit heavy haul loads from traveling during specially designated rush hour traffic. In some instances, it’s more expedient to take a different route entirely and bypass certain states.

Escort Vehicles

The state laws governing escort vehicles is a hodge-podge of requirements. Some states require one escort vehicle, others require two, and still other states don’t require one at all when transporting across state lines. Similar situations can arise with oversize load signage.

Licensing and Registration

Drivers only need a CDL license and be 21 years old when transporting across state lines with a heavy haul load. However, the commercial vehicle will require a U.S. Department of Transportation number for traveling across state lines.

Drive Times

There are very stringent rules set forth by the Department of Transportation as to how many hours a truck driver can actually operate. The catch is that some states have rules that contradict federal standards.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

Can’t Rush Heavy Haul Delivery

One of the biggest mistakes that people make when hiring a heavy hauler is not allowing sufficient time for the delivery. Transporting a heavy haul load is far different than moving something in a pickup truck. It’s just one of the reasons that those with a heavy haul load should schedule their transport early – there’s no rushing a heavy haul delivery.

Heavy Haul Delivery

Peak and Non-Peak Times

Heavy haul drivers are in high demand throughout the year, but heavy haul companies have peak and non-peak times just like every other industry. Heavy haul companies are typically booked months in advance. It’s easier to schedule transport during off-peak hours whenever possible and it can even save money.

Mapping the Route

Planning the route that the heavy haul delivery will take is a prime consideration and will depend largely on the ultimate destination. An escort vehicle may be needed and the driver may be required to carry specialized equipment to comply with different state rules and regulations. Loads must be routed along roads to avoid low overpasses, narrow bridges, and roads that can’t handle the weight.

Depending on the load, drivers may be restricted to specific daylight hours when they can be on the road. Additionally, the shortest route may not always be the best or least expensive. This is particularly true when crossing borders or shipping overseas. The terrain that must be traveled will impact delivery times. Safety is a No. 1 concern. Steep grades and hairpin turns require slower speeds and caution to navigate.

Traffic

Congested roadways, rush hours, and accidents are all traffic-related conditions that will affect heavy haul deliveries. Any of those situations can result in the driver being stuck in traffic for hours. Road construction is one of the biggest problems heavy haulers will encounter, but natural disasters are becoming increasingly common. Earthquakes, unseasonal storm and tornado outbreaks, forest fires and mudslides are just some of the traffic concerns that may require rerouting.

Documentation

Whether clients are shipping within the state, across the nation, or overseas, there’s an extensive amount of documentation that must be received before the transport can even begin. The timeline for obtaining that paperwork will depend on how many applications are being processed by authorities at any given time.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more

The Importance of Load Dimensions

Load dimensions are critical to transporting heavy equipment and machinery. Heavy haul drivers can be required to deliver to a wide range of locations, from metropolitan areas to rural sites. Drivers may have to contend with bridges, overpasses and a variety of road surfaces. All of those are critical elements when transporting heavy loads to avoid damage to trucks, cargo and infrastructure.

Despite improvements and repairs to interstate roads, there’s a whole other world out there where secondary roads have received only minimal upkeep to bridges. Many structures were built at a time when heavy haul loads were smaller in terms of height, length, weight and width.

Load Dimensions

Height

Almost everyone has seen at least one newscast showing a truck stuck under an overpass, disrupting vehicle or even rail travel. The damage to the truck and overpass can be extensive. It’s one of the reasons that escort vehicles are often used. Heavy haul companies make every effort to carefully map out routes to avoid those problems, but they can still arise. Escort vehicles run interference for truckers and keep them informed about potential problems.

Length

The length of a heavy hauler can be a problem, particularly on secondary roads that may have sharp curves and turns. Rural roads aren’t designed or laid out in the same way as primary routes. Heavy haulers require more room to maneuver.

Weight

Primary roads are typically maintained in decent condition, but there are exceptions. Secondary roads, also known as feeders, are an entirely different matter. They’re usually maintained by local governments and in an attempt to manage costs, the roadbed and surface may not be able to adequately handle the weight of a heavy hauler. Damage can be significant and the bridge may collapse.

Width

The width of a heavy haul load can also be problematic, especially on secondary roads and in rural areas. Many of the bridges in those locations haven’t changed much in decades, haven’t been updated to wider widths, and are nearing the end of their lifespan. No trucker wants to find themselves with a need to back up or attempt a turnaround.

Another problem in rural areas are bridges that are deliberately cut narrow to accommodate road widths or a lack of shoulders. Many of these constructions barely leave room for two cars to meet on the bridge at the same time. It’s easy to see how this presents a problem for today’s wider loads.

Contact us today for Free Shipping Estimates and heavy hauling trucking information. We welcome any questions, concerns, or comments you may have.

CONTACT US TODAY

Heavy Equipment Export | North American Heavy Haul

Read more